The Pipe Surgeon – How to Maintain a Private Septic System

The Pipe Surgeon knows that if you live in a rural area, you are likely to have a private septic system. Private septic systems are a must when a municipality does not have a sewage system. For example, many homes in Alaska are located off the grid and rely only on solar electricity and private septic systems.

The Pipe Surgeon

In short, a septic system is your own sewage management facility. A septic system is usually located in a basement or behind a home, out of sight, and doesn’t emit any odors when property maintained.

Modern septic systems are easy to maintain. A well-constructed septic tank should last a lifetime. This being said, the area where the septic system waste pipes are located will most likely need a treatment or replacement about fifteen years after installation.

To keep your septic system problem-free, you will need to follow several simple rules.

Be careful about what goes into the system. Your septic tank needs to sustain a delicate biological balance, which can be easily upset.

Make sure to not put too much water into the septic tank. A septic tank works because of a natural separation of lighter waste and solid debris. The solids settle on the bottom of the tank while lighter waste, such as oil, eventually moves to the top and forms a scum layer. The liquid between the two layers clarifies and flows out through an outlet pipe. Putting too much water into the tank may cause it to back up.

Also, avoid putting excessive amounts of any chemicals, coffee grounds, cooking oils, paper towels, cigarette butts, or other materials that will not decompose. If you start having issues with your septic tank, call the Pipe Surgeon for help.

Advertisements

The Pipe Surgeon – Using Commercial Drain Cleaners and Unclogging Waste Drains

The Pipe Surgeon first learned plumbing at a vocational school. He then continued learning about the craft at his first job, later opening his own business. He knows everything there is to know about cleaning drains.

The Pipe Surgeon

Most commercial drain cleaners have lye as the active ingredient. Lye dissolves hair and soap scums almost instantly. All you have to do is pour a few cups of a commercial cleaner down the drain, follow it with hot water, and you are done. This is an effective technique for keeping your drains clean and unclogging your sinks. However, too much of a strong cleaner can lead to potential problems. Most strong commercial drain cleaners are not safe for your pipes if used in large amounts. Make sure to read the instructions on the label and follow them carefully.

One of the easiest ways to unclog your waste drains is by using clean-outs, or access points on the waste drain line with removable caps. The National Plumbing Code states that clean-outs need to be placed at least every hundred linear feet of horizontal waste lines. The number of clean-outs is even higher when the bends of horizontal sections of pipes exceed 135 degrees.

Clean-outs in your home are located under sinks, sticking out of exterior walls, and randomly under the floor, but not hidden under the soil. If you know where the clean-outs are located in your home, you can use this knowledge to do easy waste line maintenance by yourself by using a pair of pliers or a wrench to remove the cover of a clean-out. Then use an auger to clear clogs.

It is always smart to have a professional such as the Pipe Surgeon to conduct regular inspections of your waste drains.

The Pipe Surgeon – How to Fix Tub and Shower Drains

Like the Pipe Surgeon says, if your shower or tub are not draining, the first thing you want to make sure is that it is an isolated issue. For example, if your sink also has a clog it may be a coincidence, but it also may be that your main drain has an issue. You can be 100% certain that your problem is with the main drain if your sink drains into your tub. This could mean that you need to use a drain cleaning service or that a drum trap needs to be cleaned.

The Pipe Surgeon

If in addition to a plugged shower and sink drain your toilet also won’t flush, then the problem definitely lies with the drain that leads into the bathroom fixtures. However, if the problem is just with your tub or shower, then you can do certain things yourself that may fix the issue.

Just like the bathroom sinks, tub and shower drain pipes can get soap and hair clogs. This combination guarantees that clogs will happen. The scum from the soap solidifies as it goes down the drain. It can also cause hairs to bind together. This mass grows bigger and bigger with every bath or shower that you take. Regularly pouring boiling clean water down the drain can help dissolve this mass, sending it down the drain.

When working with shower drains, you want to use an auger and feed its head through the drain opening. It is always better to salvage the clog than to push it further down the drain. Sometimes it’s not easy to do, and that’s when you want to use the services of a professional such as The Pipe Surgeon.